Vol 1, No 2 (2016)

Table of Contents

EDITORIAL

917 Views, 807 PDF Downloads
Christina Kakderi, Nicos Komninos, Panagiotis Tsarchopoulos
DOI:10.18063/JSC.2016.01.001

Abstract

The special issue “Smart Cities and Cloud Compu-ting” of the Journal of Smart Cities focuses on smart city solutions that are deployed over various types of cloud environment and discuss challenges and solu-tions related to the use of cloud computing, and main-ly the migration of smart city services to the Cloud.

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RESEARCH ARTICLE

816 Views, 541 PDF Downloads
Christina Kakderi, Nicos Komninos, Panagiotis Tsarchopoulos
DOI:10.18063/JSC.2016.01.002

Abstract

Since the emergence of cloud computing paradigm, there has been an increasing interest on the adoption of cloud computing from municipalities and city governments towards their effort to address complex urban problems. This paper explores the significant role that cloud computing can play in helping cities on their way to become smart. We focus on the STORM CLOUDS paradigm as a solution for municipalities everywhere in order to (i) deploy a portfolio of smart cities applications related to governance, economy and quality of life on a single cloud-based platform and (ii) use the platform and its accompanied tools to migrate their existing applications to the cloud environment. Besides the conclusions from the STORM experience, the paper closes with a number of research trends and future challenges that are expected to define the adoption of cloud computing from municipalities and city governments in the following years

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467 Views, 230 PDF Downloads
Marco Battarra, Marco Consonni, Samuele De Domenico, Andrea Milani
DOI:10.18063/JSC.2016.01.003

Abstract

This paper describes our work on STORM CLOUDS[1], a project with the main objective of migrating smart-city services, that Public Authorities (PAs) currently provided using traditional Information Technology, to a cloud-based environment. Our organization was in charge of finding the technical solutions, so we designed and implemented a cloud computing solution called Storm Clouds Platform (SCP), for that purpose. In principle, the applications we ported could run on a public cloud service, like Amazon Web ServicesTM[2] or Microsoft® Azure[3], that provide computational resources on a pay-per-use paradigm. However, these solutions have disadvantages due to their proprietary nature: vendor lock-in is one of the issues but other serious problems are related to the lack of full control on how data and applications are processed in the cloud. As an example, when using a public cloud, the users of the cloud services have very little control on the location where applications run and data are stored, if there is any. This is identified as one of the most important obstacles in cloud computing adoption, particularly in applications manage personal data and the application provider has legal obligation of preserving end user privacy[4]. This paper explains how we faced the problem and the solutions we found. We designed a cloud computing platform — completely based on open software components — that can be used for either implementing private clouds or for porting applications to public clouds.

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